Travels

Visit to the Forbidden City of Beijing

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One of the greatest contrasts you can find in Beijing - and, perhaps, throughout China - is the coexistence in the city center of the former house of the Emperors and the most representative monuments of Communism, concepts as antagonistic as my person and wanting to get up early to go to work.


You can take a walk through the largest public square in the World -Tiananmen- famous for the bloody riots that occurred in 1989, when students and workers allied to ask for democracy in China. The Numismatic Museum and the National Museum of China are guarding the square on both sides.

It was a sunny but cold day and we were only in the square just enough time to take some photos, take a short walk and be pose puppets for the photos of Chinese tourists from the interior of the country who were surprised to see us and wanted to take the memory of The photo with western tourists. A laugh and a pleasure.

We headed to the entrance to the Forbidden City, guarded by military police and chaired by a large photo of the communist hero, Mao Tse Tung.

He access ticket costs 40Y per person and does not include the Treasury Chamber. The guides will offer you their services, but we reject them and we took an audio guide for another 40Y. If you want to do the old trick of picking one up for a group, know that you only get a headset and can only hear each comment once. But hey, put it on and recite it to others.

The truth is that I think it was worth taking it because it tells you funny stories.

The enclosure is quite large and we walked through it for 3 hours. Crowd of palaces where banquets, parties or meetings were organized, bedrooms for the Emperor and concubines, jade exhibitions, weapons and even the Treasury room (which we did not enter because it closed at 3.30).

Honestly, once you see the interior - from the fences, because you cannot enter - from one of the palaces, the others seem similar, but what gives the place magic is to think about what life was like at the time those that the Forbidden City was a hotbed of diplomats, counselors, concubines, cooks, soldiers and, of course, the Emperor.

I liked listening to the stories that the audio was chattering and trying to give it life with the imagination. For those of you who like movies, I recommend watching "The Last Emperor" to be able to recognize the scenarios represented in the film.

The different palaces have the typical oriental roofs, bright colors for columns, ceilings and walls and ornaments in bronze, marble and wood of various animals. The main palace is a masterpiece made entirely of woods of different colors. The opulence among which the Chinese emperors It is unparalleled, costing - for example - an imperial wedding the equivalent of 55 kilos of silver. The last wedding, already in the twentieth century and with a China mired in poverty in the crisis, still cost 28,000 kilos of silver.

A must see and beautiful that will also help you understand the history of this great country.

5.001

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